How Can I delete Porn Inside my mind?

#1

Hey Guys I need your advice
I recently lost my 115 days streak. I felt some of benefits so called superpowers after crossing 60 days mark. I was quite confident that I ll reach at a very long period of streak.
But Accidentally I saw an erotic video on YouTube, which which was keep on running in my head. I finally couldn’t control & watched my favourite pornstar video & Relapsed man. I felt really bad of losing my 100+ days streak. Soon Came Weakness, depression, Anxiety all of these things.

So after that I committed for never Relapsing again. Now I am on 5th days. I have a very strong urge. Urge not to masterbate but to watch that my favourite video. That video scene is keeps on pop on in my head.
Please suggest me what should I do
Follow the thought and watch that video … This ll lead me to finally Relapsing again
Or I should keep on fighting with the urge to avoid.
Please suggest me guys how should I deal with the situation. I really don’t want to relapse. Please Help me.

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#2

wow… its really sad to know that you relapsed after 100 more days. i am just in my 4th days after relapsed twice. I don’t have any solution for you. But i wish you can deal with it…

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#3

They are all part and parcels of God. All their opulence (beauty, etc) are coming from God. So, it is better to turn towards God and grab the whole package. When you will think like this, all stool sticking to the layers of your mind will be wiped away gradually. You have to turn spiritual to remain peaceful in nofap. There is no other way, there is no other way, there is no other way…

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#4

@Nayak

Neuroscientists Have Revealed What Your Brain Needs to Really Erase a Memory

BY PETER DOCKRILL

MARCH 12, 2019

When bad things happen, we don’t want to remember. We try to block, resist, ignore – but we should perhaps be doing the opposite, researchers say.

A new study led by scientists in Texas suggests the act of intentionally forgetting is linked to increased cerebral engagement with the unwanted information in question. In other words, to forget something, you actually need to focus on it.

“A moderate level of brain activity is critical to this forgetting mechanism,” explains psychologist Tracy Wang from the University of Texas at Austin.

“Too strong, and it will strengthen the memory; too weak, and you won’t modify it.”

Trying to actively forget unwanted memories doesn’t just help prevent your brain from getting overloaded.

It also lets people move on from painful experiences and emotions they’d rather not recall, which is part of the reason it’s an area of active interest to neuroscientists.

“We may want to discard memories that trigger maladaptive responses, such as traumatic memories, so that we can respond to new experiences in more adaptive ways,” says one of the researchers, Jarrod Lewis-Peacock.

“Decades of research has shown that we have the ability to voluntarily forget something, but how our brains do that is still being questioned.”

Much prior research on intentional forgetting has focussed on brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, and the brain’s memory centre, the hippocampus.

In the new study, the researchers monitored a different part of the brain called the ventral temporal cortex, which helps us process and categorise visual stimuli.

In an experiment with 24 healthy young adults, the participants were shown pictures of scenes and people’s faces, and were instructed to either remember or forget each image.

During the experiment, each of the participants had their brain activity monitored by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machines.

When the researchers examined activity in the ventral temporal cortex, they found that the act of forgetting effectively uses more brain power than remembering.

“Pictures followed by a forget instruction elicited higher levels of processing in [the] ventral temporal cortex compared to those followed by a remember instruction,” the authors write in their paper.

“This boost in processing led to more forgetting, particularly for items that showed moderate (vs. weak or strong) activation.”

Of course, forgetting specific images on demand in a contrived laboratory experiment is very different to moving on from painful or traumatic memories of events experienced in the real world.

But the mechanisms at work could be the same, researchers say, and figuring out how to activate them could be a huge benefit to people around the world who need to forget things, but don’t know how.

Especially since this finding in particular challenges our natural intuition to suppress things; instead, we should involve more rather than less attention to unwanted information, in order to forget it.

“Importantly, it’s the intention to forget that increases the activation of the memory,” Wang says.

“When this activation hits the ‘moderate level’ sweet spot, that’s when it leads to later forgetting of that experience.”

The findings are reported in JNeurosci .

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#5

@Aoshigreen Thanks for your great post.

Please tell me the final suggestions what you are trying to convey. I have a very strong urge to watch a particular my favourite video

Whether I should watch the same video again to satisfy the hunger of my brain. I know if I ll do this this ll finally leave only after ejaculating, which I don’t want.

Or I shouldn’t watch the video.
I don’t want to relapse.

#6

Don’t watch that video. Nothing good will come out of it.

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#7

At first, same as the one from aoshigreen.
I’ve been using headspace now for over half a year. The concept there is exactly the same. To note a thought rising, acknowledge it and moving on to something different.

If you violently try to focus on something else you will always lose.
What you could try is, to imagine that thought actively. Don’t just dwell on it or let your mind uncontrollably wander around. But rationally, try to see what your thought wants to tell you. Think about the pros and cons. Your favorite pornstar really doesn’t care about you. Is it love she shows in here clips? Definitely not. Do you gain happiness, friends, security by watching her acting? Definitely not. So, what is the point?
I guess as a human we will always like a good looking woman. I don’t think that this is wrong. The question is, how we wanna respond to that. Do we wanna let our mind uncontrollably wander around and loose itself in the thoughts about that girl?
Better is to take our thoughts by their hand. They can see this girl but once acknowledged you can move to the next thing which is more important. Like having a child. Let it discover but lead it into the right direction

It is a difficult concept to explain and takes practice. But it can really help once one has mastered it.
I realized that it is difficult to explain without sounding like I suggest to just think about porn every now and again :sweat_smile:

It’s the difference between an unleashed mind which randomly runs around and you having the control.

I know your feeling. I had that multiple times. Once peaked it is really hard to control it. But you can grow on that. Try not to watch it. It will be hard but it can be done. Watching it and relapsing really is the worst option.

That doesn’t have to be. That is only what your mind tells you. Dude, you were on an amazing streak. You slipped once. You don’t loose all your progress. You shouldn’t feel like on day 1 of your journey. That is ONLY in your head! Feel like on a normal day. weakness, anxiety, strength, resilience, and so on are part of your character. Strength is built over time. It is how you behave. These are not some ridiculous things disappearing just because of a single relapse!
So many people think( not actively but their opinion) that they have to feel bad after a relapse, because everyone is reporting how bad they feel after a relapse. But that is just wrong. You feel bad at the moment because you are expecting to feel bad!

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#8

I don’t think you can… that’s something you’ll have to live with… maybe with time some of those thoughts will vanish.

I think that’s a huge difference with this drug (porn) that makes it so harmful, you can’t eradicate completely from your body because it’s in your mind, and you can’t control what not to remember.

I don’t believe it’s something to lose motivation, but it’s necessary to be conscious of what we see, and know we have to live with our memory forever.

Maybe you can analyze that images you have in mind, and ask yourself some questions, why do I like? is it good for me? Why do I need to see it again? then you might have some clues on how to refuse the urge.

Good luck man…

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#9

The point I took from the study is the harder we (for the sake of a better phrase) ‘put-up-a-fight’ the more mental energy we use.

Just allow the urge, think about that, feel the urge. What is this feeling? What is the opposite feeling? What is feeling? What is feeling really horny? What is feeling really sad? What is feeling fantastico!? What is despair? What is hope? Hate… Love… Peace & Chaos…


In a clearer state, like in church, I will think about images I’ve seen, I’ll often distort them, mix them up, or imagine they’re just pieces of paper I can cut up.
Obviously, it’ll never take away from the humanity of the person in the image - but that’s worth saving for another time.

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#10

Work on being more passive, able to reflect on difficult things while remaining impartial.
[note to self]